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Top 35 Holiday Grief Quotes

Holiday Grief Quotes

This post contains some of the best holiday grief quotes.

Holiday Grief Quotes

1. “A wonderful thing about the holidays is that they encourage us to remember those we love. Even though it may hurt to remember, don’t forget that remembering the past makes hoping for the future possible.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

2. “Above all, mourning is a spiritual journey of the heart and soul. And the holidays are a spiritual time of year. Together the two demand your spiritual time and attention.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

3. “Accept your unique thoughts and feelings this holiday season. Find ways to mourn that work for you.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

4. “As mourners, we need the love and understanding of others if we are to heal. When your friends and family reach out to you during the holidays, accept their support. Let them spend time with you and take care of you. You need their help and they need to give it.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

5. “Be open to the possibility of happiness during the holidays. And if and when you do feel glimpses of happiness, do so without guilt. You are still alive, and finding happiness means you are carrying on with your life’s purpose.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

6. “Because you’re in mourning this year, you may feel like not “doing” the holidays at all. That’s an understandable thought! But your family’s holiday traditions are an important part of your shared history as well as your continuing lives. You may find yourself wanting to celebrate as you always have for memory’s sake” – Alan D. Wolfelt

Related: Resilient Grieving: Best 17 Ways To Manage Grief In The Workplace (+FREE Grief Worksheets)

7. “Don’t assume that your holidays will be totally miserable this year. Yes, if you are actively mourning, you will experience pain and sadness. But if you spend time in the company of people you love, you may also experience moments of great joy and hope.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

8. “During the holidays, your pain may be closer to the surface. The ritual and intimacy of the holidays may make you more emotional. Remember that your emotions are normal and natural, and when you feel them it means it’s time for you to feel them.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

9. “During your time of grief, the very rituals of the holidays can help you survive them.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

10. “Even your holiday self has changed. You may have gone from loving the holidays to dreading them or from being a big holiday baker to not wanting to spend a minute in the kitchen. The holidays will be different this year in part because you’re different this year.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

11. “Holidays have such rich associations for us because humankind created them as a way to honor and celebrate that which is truly important.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

Related: ACT For Grief and Loss: 6 Powerful Tools and Worksheets to Help You Move Forward with Grief – Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

12. “However, most of the time you are in deep grief and feel as if you’re standing under a dark cloud. Are there other options that you might think and perceive? The grief is real, but does there have to be a dark cloud? Could you be in the afterglow of love instead? Could you surround yourself in the gratitude of your love?” – Louise L. Hay & David Kessler

13. “I want you to know that you can find continued meaning in the holidays and in life. You can continue to live and love fully. You must grieve but you can also celebrate.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

14. “If the death was very recent, you may be in survival mode this holiday season. If that’s true for you, it’s OK—the world will keep turning whether you participate in the holidays or not” – Alan D. Wolfelt

15. “If you find yourself alone this holiday season, reach out to neighbors, people at your place of worship, or a grief support group.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

Related: How To Help A Grieving Friend? 6 Things to Avoid Saying to a Grieving Person

16. “If you keep yourself too busy during the holidays, you may leave yourself no time to work on this critical need of mourning. Don’t overschedule and don’t try to “keep busy” simply to avoid the pain.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

17. “It takes a true commitment to heal in your grief. Yes, you are changed, but with commitment and intention you can and will become whole again.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

18. “It’s certainly helpful to take advantage of grief as a time to reflect on the past with tenderness—but to relive it over and over is painful and nonproductive. That’s what you tend to do when you just go back without an intention of healing.” – Louise L. Hay & David Kessler

19. “Let your holiday grief be what it is. And let yourself—your new, grieving self—be who you are.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

20. “Part of your struggle with the holidays will likely involve trying to find ongoing meaning in them. It may seem like the holidays are meaningless this year. Trust that in time and through the work of mourning, you will find meaning in the holidays again.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

Related: Grief Comes In Waves: Top 12 Lessons From Grief No One Talks About

21. “Setting your intention to mourn and heal during the holidays—and beyond—is one important way to move forward in your grief journey.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

22. “The holidays encourage memory-sharing.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

23. “The pain of grief is one thing. Our thoughts then add to the suffering.” – Louise L. Hay & David Kessler

24. “This holiday season, you will probably experience a multitude of different emotions in a wave-like fashion. You will also likely encounter more than one need of mourning at the same time. Be compassionate with yourself as you experience your own unique grief journey.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

25. “We’re asking you to change your thinking after a loss occurs—not to avoid the pain of grief, but to keep moving through it. We want your thoughts to live in a place where you remember your loved one only with love, not with sadness or regret.” – Louise L. Hay & David Kessler

Related: Grieving Someone Who Is Still Alive – Ambiguous Grief

26. “When someone loved dies, the holidays can be so very painful. The heart of the holidays has been torn apart. Without love, what is life? Without the people we love, what are the holidays?” – Alan D. Wolfelt

27. “When you sing holiday songs, allow yourself to embrace any grief feelings the music stirs within you. Attending services at your place of worship, praying and meditating are other meaningful ways to tap into the healing power of ritual this holiday season.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

28. “When you think about the holiday season as this vast period of celebration from Thanksgiving to New Year’s, it can definitely seem overwhelming, especially when you’re in mourning.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

29. “When your grief overwhelms you this holiday season, try focusing on the now. Your grief wants you to live in the past through memories of the precious person who died. Remembering is indeed important, and your memories will always be a special part of your life.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

Related: Best +30 Grief Activities For Adults (+FREE Worksheets PDF)

30. “You can create an experience of fully feeling the grief and desiring the healing, or you can become a victim of the pain.” – Louise L. Hay & David Kessler

31. “You have the power within you to create a new, more positive reality. When you change your thoughts about grief and loss, it doesn’t mean you won’t feel the pain or you won’t go through the grief. It just means that you won’t get stuck in any one feeling.” – Louise L. Hay

32. “The holidays may well help you move toward your grief, and that is a good thing.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

33. “Experiencing moments of happiness and joy during the holidays does not mean you didn’t deeply love the person who died. It merely means that you are alive and can continue to live.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

34. “This holiday season, if you’re tired, rest. If have muscle aches and pains, take a hot bath or an ibuprofen. If you’re thirsty, drink water (and lots of it!).” – Alan D. Wolfelt

35. “Start a meaningful new holiday tradition by giving a gift in the name of the person who died.” – Alan D. Wolfelt

Related: Best 21 Grief Journaling Prompts (+FREE Grief Worksheets PDF)

Grief WorkSheets

References

  • Portions of this article were adapted from the book Healing Your Holiday Grief, © 2005 by Alan D. Wolfelt. All rights reserved.

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