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Pornography Addiction: Is There Hope? 6 Tips On How To Get Free From Porn Addiction

Best 6 Tips On How To Get Free From Porn Addiction?

This post contains “porn addiction test” along with helpful tips to find hope and get free from pornography addiction.

Porn Addiction Test: Am I Addicted To Porn Quiz?

Results


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#1. Do you spend far more time watching pornography than you originally intended?

#2. Do you fail in your efforts to stop or limit your consumption of pornography?

#3. Do you experience enjoyment before and during watching porn followed by feelings of shame after?

#4. Do you become irritable or angry when you’re unable to watch pornography?

#5. Have you lost some of your ability to feel pleasure in things you once did (e.g. hobbies, exercise, work, certain activities, etc.)?

#6. Has consuming pornography interfered with or negatively affected your personal and professional life?

Finish

We will not sell your information. All results are kept confidential.

This quiz is for informational purposes only. It is not meant as a diagnostic or assessment tool.

Results

The questions above represent common signs of porn addiction. If you answered yes to most of these questions, then you may be addicted to pornography.

Come out of denial Worksheets (2)

The Inner Conflict of Porn Addiction

If you are addicted to pornography, you are probably familiar with the internal conflict porn addiction can create:

  • You want to stop/you don’t want to stop.
  • You worry about the risks/you ignore the risks.
  • Your addiction makes you feel bad/ Your addiction makes you feel great.

Many addicts find pornography pleasurable. They struggle to see it for what it is: deeply disturbing dehumanization and degradation of people for the pleasure of someone else.

However, some addicts may see pornography as repulsive and disturbing after acting out.

They may make great resolutions to never indulge again.

But eventually, reality hits and their resolve becomes less exciting as addicts go back to facing their pain again.

Related: How To Stop Bad Habits And Addictions?

Pornography Addiction: Is There Hope? Top 6 Tips To Get Free From Porn Addiction?

#1. Make The Distinction Between Yourself And Your Addiction

You are not your addiction.

Picture your addiction as a selfish beast that you can starve and tame until it loses its control over you.

This beast doesn’t care about you. It doesn’t care about the risks. It only wants pleasure now.

#2. Use The Word “Never”

Many people use the approach “One day at a time” to shut up their addictive voice.

However, this approach makes no long-term promises and so your addiction is willing to wait.

A better way to respond to your addictive voice is to say something like, “I never use porn.” And repeat it to yourself each time you hear your addictive voice.

Related: How To Stop Living A Double Life? Top 8 Ways to End The Stress Of Leading A Secret Life

Why Quitting Porn Gradually Doesn’t Work?

Cutting down or a ’porn diet’ keeps the addiction alive in your mind.

This keeps you preoccupied, waiting for the next session to relieve withdrawal pangs.

Ironically, this makes sessions even more enjoyable and pleasurable.

The longer the period of abstinence, the more withdrawal pangs you suffer and the more enjoyable the sessions become.

In fact, the main difficulty in stopping isn’t the neurological addiction, but the lies you believe about the addiction.

#3. Challenge Your Addictive Beliefs

Your addiction can be creative when it comes to arguing why you should consume porn.

Thoughts such as “you can’t stop,” or, “you will use again,” or, “you won’t relax until you use,” are your addictive voice.

The key here is to recognize these thoughts as lies and to repeat again, “I never use porn.”

Over time, your addictive voice will diminish and will loosen its control over you.

To help you challenge your addictive beliefs, become more aware of the thoughts you’re having right before watching porn, write them down, and question their validity.

The following questions can help you reframe your addictive beliefs:

  • “Does porn really fill a void? Or does it create one?”
  • “Does porn actually make me feel good? Or does it leave me feeling worse?”
  • “Would acting out really make my problem go away?”
  • “Do I really believe this pain will never end?”
  • “Would watching porn bring relief or would it add to my pain?”
  • “Do I honestly believe that I can’t survive without porn?”
  • “Do I really think there is no way to deal with stress in life other than watching pornography?”
  • “Do I really need to go through life sabotaging my mind and body?”

Related: How To Change Negative Beliefs? The Ultimate Guide To Challenge Negative Core Beliefs

#4. Abstain From Using

Unless you abstain from medicating your pain with pornography, you won’t be able to address your issues and learn healthier ways to cope.

Get away from the source of pornography:

  • Turn off the computer
  • Turn off the TV
  • Turn off the WiFi router
  • Turn off your phone
  • Etc.

Each time your addictive voice begins to turn your thoughts toward porn, distract yourself:

  • Listen to music you love
  • Cook your favorite meal
  • Pray
  • Talk to or text a friend
  • Try volunteering
  • Go for a walk in nature

Also, repeat to yourself, “I never use pron.”

Related: Top 45 Self Care Day Ideas at Home To Kickstart Your Self Care Ritual (+Free Self Care Worksheets PDF)

#5. Find Healthier Ways To Manage Pain

Addiction happens when we make the choice to experience pleasure when things become uncomfortable.

No one wants to feel pain. But pain is not the problem.

Pain is feedback, telling you something about what’s going on inside and around you.

Sadness, for example, tells us that we lost something important to us, or were unable to get or achieve what we want. Acknowledging this can help us slow down to reflect and motivate us to make changes in life.

When we use addictions, we lose access to the wisdom of our emotions and allow the pain and discomfort to bottle up inside us.

Discomfort usually begins as a feeling of boredom, loneliness, or stress.

But if you allow yourself to sit down with the feeling, you may discover other deeper issues.

Healthier ways to cope with emotional pain may include:

  • Mindfulness and meditation
  • Journaling: write down your thoughts and feelings
  • Talking to a safe person or a therapist

Related: How To Stop Replacing One Addiction With Another? Powerful 8-Step Guide To Emotional Sobriety

Emotions worksheets

#6. Connect With Other People Through Service

Pornography can cause us to disconnect from and dehumanize other people and addiction, in general, can lead to self-centeredness.

For addicts, the “feel-good” chemicals generated by their addiction are much more intense than the gentle joy of kindness.

Acknowledge that even though service won’t bring the same excitement your addiction brings, it is still a good step in recovery.

Related: Best 50 Acts Of Kindness to Show Compassion to Others Every Day

Porn Addiction Online Accountability Partners

Support groups for porn and sex addicts can be a great place to find support and accountability. The following are support groups that offer online support:

If you’re not comfortable seeking an accountability partner, apps can help you hold yourself accountable.

Apps like Porn Addiction Calendar – Quit and Ever Accountable can help you hold yourself accountable.

Conclusion

The only thing that prevents us from quitting porn is fear that’s caused by our addictive beliefs.

We strongly believe that we won’t survive without porn, that the pain will last forever, that we can’t relax or find enjoyment if we don’t consume pornography.

Quitting porn takes courage to face and challenge the lies we keep feeding ourselves.

FAQ

Should You Disclose Your Addiction?

Disclosing your addiction can be helpful in holding yourself accountable.

But as the Sexaholics Anonymous White Book offers, you need to do so wisely:

We suggest that newcomers to Sexaholics Anonymous not reveal their sexual past to a spouse or family member who does not already know of it, without careful consideration and a period of sexual sobriety, and even then, only after prior discussion with an SA sponsor or group. Typically, when we come into the program, we want to share our excitement with those closest to us and tell all right away. Such disclosures might injure our family or others and should be confined to the group of which we are a part until a wise course is indicated. Of course, if there is any chance we have put others in danger, we take immediate steps to try to correct that.

Few things can so damage the possibility of healing in the family as a premature confession to spouse or family where sacred bonds and trust have been violated. Unwittingly, such confessions can be attempts on our part to dump our guilt, get back into good graces, or make just another show of willpower. Great caution is advised here.

Amends to family must begin with a sexually sober, changed attitude and behavior on a daily basis. Then, as we grow in recovery, we will find how to make direct amends. Help from sponsor and group is indispensable here. There’s always a way, if we really want to make things right.” (“Sexaholics Anonymous” p. 3, 1989)

Resources

Support Groups

Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous (SLAA)

Sex Addicts Anonymous (SAA)

  • www.sexaa.org
  • P.O. Box 70949
  • Houston, TX 77270
  • (713) 869-4902 or (800) 477-8191

Sexaholics Anonymous (SA)

  • www.sa.org
  • P.O. Box 3565
  • Brentwood, TN 37024
  • (615) 370-6062 or (866) 424-8777

Sexual Compulsives Anonymous (SCA)

  • www.sca-recovery.org
  • Old Chelsea Station, PO Box 1585
  • New York, NY 10011
  • (212) 439-1123 or (800) 977-HEAL

Codependents of Sex Addicts (COSA)

S-ANON

  • www.sanon.org
  • P.O. Box 111242
  • Nashville, TN 37222-1242
  • (800) 210-8141 or (615) 833-3152

Recovering Couples Anonymous (RCA)

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

  • www.aa.org
  • P.O. Box 459,
  • New York, NY 10163
  • (212) 870-3400
Addiction Recovery Worksheets (1)

References

  • Portions of this article were adapted from the book Ten Keys to Breaking Porn Addiction, © 2007 by Anonymous. All rights reserved.

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